Midori (Yomi)

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Yomi Midori character card

Master Midori, Mentor Dragon

Contents

Transform into a mighty green dragon!

Master Midori believes in honor above all else, and instills respect and ethics in his students, as well as physical training. His master before him taught techniques too deadly to be used, and Midori saw first-hand how that power warped his now-exiled brother. Midori protects his students from such taboo knowledge.

The blood of green dragons flows through Midori's body, and he can take the physical form of a dragon for short times when his focus is strongest. His personal fighting style is defensive and solid, but his dragon form allows for powerful offense as well.



Card images

Yomi Midori 2 Yomi Midori 3 Yomi Midori 4
Yomi Midori 5 Yomi Midori 6 Yomi Midori 7
Yomi Midori 8 Yomi Midori 9 Yomi Midori 10
Yomi Midori J Yomi Midori Q Yomi Midori K
Yomi Midori A Yomi Midori Joker Yomi Midori Character Card


Deck (text)

Life: 90

Max Combo: 3

Innate:
Aspect of the Dragon: Your Dragon attacks cannot be dodged. Whenever you block an attack or Joker while in Dragon Form, you may return a non-Joker card from your discard pile to your hand instead of drawing a card. (You can only play Dragon moves while in Dragon Form.)

Defense Mastery: Opponents don't draw when you block their normal attacks.


Normal attacks: x damage, Speed x.2

Normal throws: 8 damage, Speed x.8, 2 CP Starter, Knocks down


2: Block // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 2.8, 2 CP Starter // *Dragon Form
Dragon Form: [Draw Phase] Ongoing. You can play Dragon moves. Discard this if you get thrown or if you combat-reveal a non-Dragon attack/throw.

3: Block // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 3.8, 2 CP Starter

4: Attack 4 dmg, speed 4.2, 1 CP normal // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 4.8, 2 CP Starter

5: Attack 5 dmg, speed 5.2, 1 CP normal // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 5.8, 2 CP Starter

6: Attack 6 dmg, speed 6.2, 1 CP normal // Block

7: Attack 7 dmg, speed 7.2, 1 CP normal // Block

8: Attack 8 dmg, speed 8.2, 1 CP normal // Block

9: Dodge // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 9.8, 2 CP Starter

10: Dodge // Throw (KD) 8 dmg, speed 10.8, 2 CP Starter // *Glimpse of the Dragon
Glimpse of the Dragon: [Combat Reveal] If you combat-revealed a face card while not in Dragon Form, rotate it 180 degrees to do the Dragon version of your move. (Aces aren't face cards.)

Jack: Whirlwind: Attack 8+8 (+J) (2) dmg, speed 2.4, 1 CP Ender // Toxic Breath: Attack 9 (2) dmg, speed 2.4, 1 CP Starter

Queen: Rising Mountain: Attack 10 (1) dmg, speed 1.2, 2 CP Ender // Dragon Mountain: Attack 14 (2) dmg, speed 0.6, 2 CP Linker

King: Rushing River: Throw 12 dmg, speed 4.4, Can't Combo // Talon Swoop: Throw 17 dmg, speed 1.8, Can't Combo

Ace: Wrath of Earth: Attack 20 (2) dmg, speed 1.2, 2 CP Ender AA // Final Dragon Buster: Throw 20+16 (AA+A+A) dmg, speed 0.0, Can't Combo AA


FAQ

Q: What are "normal dodges"?

A: Normal dodges are not named. DeGrey's Ghost Riposte (Ace), Lum's Blackjack (Ace), and Quince's Dodge the Question (Jack) and Evasive Answer (King) are not normal dodges, and they can all dodge your dragon attacks.


Q: What happens if I am in Dragon Form and my opponent tries to dodge my attack?

A: They get hit and discard their dodge card.


Q: Does playing a dodge, block, or Joker (Gold Burst) end Dragon Form?

A: No. Only playing a non-Dragon throw or a non-Dragon attack as your combat card, or getting thrown will end Dragon Form.


Q: Can opponents use their counters to stop my Dragon Form?

A: Yes if they counter it right away as you play your Dragon Form card. Counters only work against abilities as they are played though, so they cannot counter your Dragon Form once it's active.


Strategy

Note: This strategy guide was written for 1st Edition. Some content may be outdated.

Humanform

Midori is a block and throw-oriented character with two "modes": humanform and dragonform. His fast, efficient, normal
Midori 3
Midori 3
throws
Midori 4
Midori 4
(3~5) that combo into high
Midori 7
Midori 7
normals
Midori 8
Midori 8
(6~8) or into a pumped Whirlwind
Midori J
Midori J
(J+J) are his main threat in humanform, which is a strategy that mostly beats all throws, but loses to attacks. Because of the threat of throws, Midori's opponent will often use attacks, which Midori generally struggles against. Midori has the worst normals of the game for opening combat, his humanform face card
Midori J
Midori J
attacks
Midori Q
Midori Q
are subpar, and he is often at a loss for dodge cards (which are normally best used during dragonform), so he will spend a lot of time simply blocking the opponent's attacks while in humanform.


Throwloop

Because he has fast throws, when facing opponents other than Midori or Rook, Midori can do a throwloop when his opponent is low on hand cards. The idea is that as long as you keep throwing in combat, your opponent has no way of building their hand back up, and must attack every turn to avoid getting thrown. The smaller your opponent's hand is, the less threatening their attacks are, and the more likely they are to block, so throwing when they are low on cards is low-risk, high-reward. You usually start a throwloop right after eating a big combo, when your opponent just spent a lot of attacks and is low on cards (and especially attacks!).

During a throwloop, you might run out of your usual throw cards (3
Midori 3
Midori 3
, 4
Midori 4
Midori 4
, 5
Midori 5
Midori 5
). If you are really committed to keeping their hand small, you might want to throw with more unusual cards: Rushing River (K)
Midori K
Midori K
, 9
Midori 9
Midori 9
(normally used for dodging), 10
Midori 10
Midori 10
(normally used for Glimpse or for dodging), or 2
Midori 2
Midori 2
(normally used for Dragon Form). This is much more risky, but can pay off if your opponent has a very small hand (1 or 2) and is desperate to block. It can also pay off at the very end of a game, to finish them off relatively safely.


Yomi Midori 10

Glimpsing

During humanform, Midori can use Glimpse of the Dragon (10*)
Midori 10
Midori 10
to use the dragon side of either J
Midori J
Midori J
, Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
or K
Midori K
Midori K
in combat. Using J in combat and Glimpsing it is a questionable plan, since Whirlwind (J, humanform)
Midori J
Midori J
can be very efficiently used as a combo ender in general, and Glimpsing a K
Midori K
Midori K
is very rarely worth it (you only gain 5 damage and the ability to outspeed Rook's 3-throw
Rook 3
Rook 3
+ Midori's 3-throw
Midori 3
Midori 3
and 2-throw
Midori 2
Midori 2
). However, Glimpsing a Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
is often very good, since it's an excellent combat card on its own (0.6 speed, beats dodges) and can let you dump either a high normal
Midori 8
Midori 8
or a pumped Whirlwind (J+J)
Midori J
Midori J
for very good damage. This means that using a Rising Mountain (Q, humanform)
Midori Q
Midori Q
in combat, without a Glimpse in hand, is usually a bad idea, since using it with Glimpse or in dragonform is much better.


Yomi Midori 10

Dragonform

Once he has built up a good enough hand, with enough J, Q, K and/or A cards, Midori can use Dragon Form (2*). Dragon Form lets you use the powerful dragon moves: Toxic Breath (J)
Midori J
Midori J
, Dragon Mountain (Q)
Midori Q
Midori Q
, Talon Swoop (K)
Midori K
Midori K
and Final Dragon Buster (A)
Midori A
Midori A
. Dragon Form ends either when you get thrown or when you use a humanform attack or throw as your combat card. As Midori, your goal is to stay in Dragon Form for as long as possible, both to be able to use the powerful dragon moves you have, and to put your opponent on the defensive even when you don't have dragon moves. Setsuki (with K
Setsuki K
Setsuki K
) and Rook (with Q
Rook Q
Rook Q
) can force Midori out of dragonform by attacking into a throw ender, but for all other characters, if you use a J, Q, K or A as your combat card, you are guaranteed to remain in dragonform for the turn, so these are your preferred combat cards as long as you still have good hand cards. K in particular is much better in dragonform than out of it, so you might want to use it early during dragonform, to make sure it's used at its best.

Keep in mind that you can only beat opponent attacks faster than 0.6 by using dodges, not by using dragon moves, so always make sure to keep track of your opponent's fastest attacks.


Defense

Since the payoff for dodging an opponent's attack is much better during dragonform (dodge -> Talon Swoop (K)
Midori K
Midori K
, dodge -> Final Dragon Buster (A)
Midori A
Midori A
), the general guideline to Midori defense is this:

- When in humanform, prefer using block. In general, it's best to block a lot in the early game, where you don't have your good card combinations yet (ability cards + JQKA, normal throws + high normals), then block less as the game goes on. In rare occasions, on a strong attack read, you can dodge into a normal throw.

- When in dragonform, prefer using dodge. As a dodge follow-up, try first to dodge into a fully pumped or mid-pumped Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
(AA+A+A for 52 damage or AA+A for 36 damage). If you can't, dodge into Talon Swoop (K, dragonform)
Midori K
Midori K
. If you can't, dodge into either a pumped Whirlwind (J+J)
Midori J
Midori J
if you still have other dragon moves, or a normal throw if you don't. Remember that dodging into a normal throw does not end dragonform, so it's a good way to keep damaging your opponent and keep dragonform even when you're out of JQKA. In rare occasions, when you're really out of fuel, you can block.


Knockdown

Midori struggles a lot against knockdown. When Midori is knocked down, his lack of fast attacks means that he's very vulnerable to mixup normals. You might need to burn one of your fast attacks (Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
, AA
Midori A
Midori A
, or J
Midori J
Midori J
) to get out of normals, even if you don't have a Glimpse
Midori 10
Midori 10
- knockdown is dangerous enough to warrant that. On the other hand, when Midori knocks down his opponent, he doesn't really gain any options. His normals are very poor as combat cards, and his innate, Aspect of the Dragon
Midori Char
Midori Char
, means that his opponent already knows that dodging is practically off the table as an option. This means that when you land a normal throw
Midori 3
Midori 3
, it's almost always better to end the combo with an attack
Midori 8
Midori 8
than to get the practically useless knockdown.



Card Analysis

2
Midori 2
Midori 2

Throw / Block / Dragon Form*

You will practically always use this card for its powerful ability, Dragon Form. You might use it to throw against Rook, if you have multiple 2s, since the 2-throw's speed actually matters in that matchup, and Rook is especially strong against Dragon Form. You would be fairly desperate to use a 2 to block, though.


3
Midori 3
Midori 3

Throw / Block

This is your least valuable card with a block on it. You will block a lot using this card, and occasionally throw with it. It's often okay to powerup with this.


4
Midori 4
Midori 4

Attack / Throw

You will almost exclusively use this card for its throw. A 4-attack is neither good as a combat card nor efficient as a combo ender. It's often okay to powerup with this.


5
Midori 5
Midori 5

Attack / Throw

You will mostly use this card for its throw. A 5-attack is neither good as a combat card nor that efficient as a combo ender. It's often okay to powerup with this.


6
Midori 6
Midori 6

Attack / Block

This is your second least valuable card with a block on it, so you'll block a fair amount with this card. It's a decent combo ender. It's sometimes okay to powerup with this.


7
Midori 7
Midori 7

Attack / Block

You will mostly use this card as a combo ender (after a normal throw, Toxic Breath (J), or Dragon Mountain (Q)). Sometimes, you'll block with it.


8
Midori 8
Midori 8

Attack / Block

You will mostly use this card as an excellent combo ender (after a normal throw, Toxic Breath (J), or Dragon Mountain (Q)). Sometimes, you'll block with it.


9
Midori 9
Midori 9

Throw / Dodge

This is your only dodge card without an ability on it, so treat it as a dedicated dodge card. Only in the most extreme of circumstances should you try to throw with this.


10
Midori 10
Midori 10

Throw / Dodge / Glimpse of the Dragon*

If you have few ability cards (2
Midori 2
Midori 2
, 10) but at least one Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
, you'll probably want to use this for its ability, Glimpse of the Dragon. If you are already in dragonform, or have several ability cards (2, 10), or have no Q, you'll probably use it as a dodge. Only in the most extreme of circumstances should you try to throw with this.


Jack
Midori J
Midori J

Attack

Whirlwind (J, humanform) is a superb combo ender when pumped (16 damage, 1 cp). When you have two Js or more in hand, it's usually best to use them as a combo ender (as pumped Whirlwind, J+J). It's a good idea to use pumped Whirlwind to end any combo when you can, even while in dragonform. Whirlwind is rarely used as a combat card, though, since its dragon counterpart is much better for that role.

When you land a Toxic Breath (J, dragonform), you can combo into either two high
Midori 7
Midori 7
normals
Midori 8
Midori 8
or into Wrath of Earth (AA, humanform)
Midori A
Midori A
. Midori aces are fairly hard to land, so it's generally okay to use Wrath of Earth (AA) as a combo ender. However, if you already have 3 or 4 aces, and especially if you are in dragonform, you might want to combo into high normals instead, to save the aces for Final Dragon Buster (AA+A+A, dragonform)
Midori A
Midori A
.


Queen
Midori Q
Midori Q

Attack

Rising Mountain (Q, humanform) is one of Midori's very few fast attacks, and at speed 1.2, it's very unimpressive as that. In emergencies, you might use this as your combat card (to get out of knockdown, for instance), but it's generally better to save your queens for their incredible dragon side, Dragon Mountain.

Dragon Mountain (Q, dragonform) is technically a Linker, but just consider it as a Starter - you will never, ever combo into a Dragon Mountain. It's a much better combat card than your normals and than Toxic Breath (J, dragonform)
Midori J
Midori J
, is your fastest attack, and deals a truckload of damage. After landing a Dragon Mountain, you have the same options as after landing a normal throw: a high normal
Midori 8
Midori 8
or a Whirlwind (J)
Midori J
Midori J
.


King
Midori K
Midori K

Throw

Talon Swoop (K, dragonform), at 17 damage, is the most damage-efficient card in the game, outside of some Lum Blackjack
Lum A
Lum A
or Pilebunker
DeGrey Q
DeGrey Q
+ Moral High Ground
DeGrey Char
DeGrey Char
scenarios. It's an excellent combat card and an excellent dodge follow-up.

On the other hand, Rushing River (K, humanform), at 12 damage, deals less damage than most normal throw combos. This means that using Rushing River is somewhat of a desperation move, and you generally want to save your Kings for dragonform.


Ace
Midori A
Midori A

Attack / Throw

A fully pumped Final Dragon Buster (AA+A+A, throw) is the most damaging move in the game, but it's pretty hard to land. You must have Dragon Form to use it (Glimpse
Midori 10
Midori 10
will not help), and mixup between playing it as your combat card or dodging into it.

Playing it as a combat card has the advantage that, by itself, it beats everything except attacks and jokers, and that if you land it, your opponent can only combo escape part of the damage (20 damage guaranteed). However, it obviously loses to attacks, and if you guess wrong, you lose two aces right away.

Dodging into Final Dragon Buster has the obvious advantage that it beats all attacks and jokers. Combined with the option of playing Final Dragon Buster by itself, this means that the opponent has no safe option out of Final Dragon Buster. Dodging into it also has the advantage that you get to keep all your aces on a wrong guess. However, you can lose dragonform on a wrong guess, so it's somewhat risky to dodge early in dragonform (when you still have many dragon moves available). It also leaves the entire damage vulnerable to combo escapes.

Final Dragon Buster is powerful, but pretty hard to land, so you'll often use Wrath of Earth (AA, humanform attack) instead. You'll often find that you use Wrath of Earth when you have exactly two aces, but save for Final Dragon Buster when you have 3 or 4. You can use it:

  • As a combo ender after Toxic Breath (J, dragonform)
    Midori J
    Midori J
    . This is pretty good.
  • As a combo ender after a normal attack
    Midori 6
    Midori 6
    played in combat. This is rarely used, since Midori normal attacks are very poor combat cards.
  • As your combat option (humanform, one of your only fast attacks). This is especially useful in the late game.


Joker
Midori Joker
Midori Joker
Midori's Aces are generally hard to land outside of dragonform, so unless you are already in dragonform and have 1 or 2 aces in hand (for instance, you tried a full Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
in combat, but got attacked out of it), or you really need to beat your opponent's combat option (getting up from a knockdown), you'll probably stick to using your jokers as combo escapes.



Matchups

Grave

Midori vs Grave

The biggest threat to be aware of, in this matchup, is Grave's True Power of Storms (AAA attack)
Grave A
Grave A
. Grave will regularly try to land a normal attack and combo it into True Power of Storms, so it's very important to keep your jokers as combo escapes, and give Grave very few openings for him to try this. He can also use it in combat when you gain dragonform, since its speed of 0.4 actually outspeeds all your attacks, so use dodges liberally during dragonform. Do not try to use your normal attacks in combat against Grave.

Since his True Power of Storms needs three aces, your best time to pressure Grave with throws is at the start of the game, and whenever you see at least two aces in his discard.

His Lightning Cloud (J attack)
Grave J
Grave J
can be very annoying to deal with, and might force you to use an early Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
, AA
Midori A
Midori A
, or dodge. Both sides of your J
Midori J
Midori J
clash with it.

This matchup is slightly in Grave's favor, but keeping a good early throw-based pressure and using dodges wisely should let you win.


Jaina

Midori vs Jaina

Jaina will use her Dragonheart (Q)
Jaina Q
Jaina Q
a lot, and buy it back often through her innate, Burning Vigor. Her Charged Shot (J)
Jaina J
Jaina J
means you will actually need to attack her at times, and she has a strong late game, so you'll need to use dodges more often than usual, especially in the early game, before she can use her Smoldering Embers (10)
Jaina 10
Jaina 10
to make you pay for dodging. She can do some very big, high damage combos, so it's a good idea to keep jokers for combo escapes. Assume she has a Q
Jaina Q
Jaina Q
in hand at all times, but don't get too squeamish about normal-throwing her. Getting an early life lead, before she can put together her big combos, is crucial to winning here. Because of Charged Shot
Jaina J
Jaina J
, this is one of the few matchups where it's actually reasonable to go for a combo of normal attack
Midori 6
Midori 6
-> Wrath of Earth (AA, humanform)
Midori A
Midori A
.

This matchup is in Jaina's favor.


Midori

Midori vs Midori

Since Midori likes to block and throw, this matchup, alongside Rook, is one of the rare ones where you'll be using your normal attacks in combat. The 3-throw
Midori 3
Midori 3
is crucial, since it loses to no humanform throw except 2-throw
Midori 2
Midori 2
. You can use your 2-throw if you have several 2s in hand, but Dragon Form is usually still a better choice. When in dragonform, Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
is an excellent combat choice, losing only to attacks (and Midori's humanform attacks are not very scary to dragonform Midori).

Unlike practically every other matchup, dodges are worth very little, and you won't spend much time blocking at all, except maybe against a dragonform opponent.


Setsuki

Midori vs Setsuki

Throw, throw, throw: that's what you'll be doing for a lot of this matchup. Even your fastest attacks will tend to lose cleanly to Setsuki's attacks, and even her fastest throws will lose cleanly to yours. Simply keep your mixup between block/dodge and throw, and you should do fine. Keep in mind that Setsuki wants to empty her hand, so she's more likely to open with a throw if she has a medium-big hand (about 7 cards), and more likely to attack if she can't possibly empty her hand (big hand). Small-hand Setsuki is harder to read, but is unlikely to still have a Ninpo Flash (Q attack, speed 0.0)
Setsuki Q
Setsuki Q
, so you can try to sneak in a fast attack of your own. Setsuki has a weak late game and low health, so a possible strategy is to block a lot at the beginning, and try to build up to Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
, to knock her out in one blow. Sneaking in Dragon Mountain
Midori Q
Midori Q
combos and hit-confirmed Toxic Breath (J, dragonform)
Midori J
Midori J
-> Wrath of Earth (AA, humanform)
Midori A
Midori A
is also effective, because of their raw damage and because Setsuki can't dodge them and is unlikely to block much. Note that Setsuki can combo attacks into her K throw
Setsuki K
Setsuki K
to force you out of dragonform, so dodging during dragonform against Setsuki has much less opportunity cost than in other matchups.

Because of her innate, Setsuki is extremely unlikely to choose to not complete a combo, so combo escapes will practically always be useful (more than gold bursts).

This matchup is in Midori's favor.


Rook

Midori vs Rook

As against Midori, you'll find yourself using a surprisingly big amount of normal attacks in this matchup, since your throws aren't nearly as powerful and since Rook likes to throw a lot himself (and has slow normals too).

The biggest thing to note is that dragonform is actually very weak against Rook.

  • He has no dodges to disable,
  • his two special blocks (Stone Wall
    Rook 5
    Rook 5
    and Entangling Vines
    Rook 3
    Rook 3
    ) work very well against dragon attacks,
  • he can Rock Armor
    Rook Char
    Rook Char
    through your mixup of dragon attacks or throws,
  • or outspeed your J
    Midori J
    Midori J
    and beat dragon throws with Wall of Vines (AA attack)
    Rook A
    Rook A
    ,
  • he can outspeed your Talon Swoop (K, dragonform)
    Midori K
    Midori K
    with his 2-throw
    Rook 2
    Rook 2
    ,
  • and he can force you out of dragonform by comboing into Rolling Stone (Q throw)
    Rook Q
    Rook Q
    .

This means that you'll spend most of your time in humanform, and instead of building up a hand that can use dragonform, you'll mostly be rushing him down with normal throws and normal attacks. Even playing humanform J and Q in combat can be reasonable options, if you really need to keep up the pressure.

Generally, the only thing worth combo-escaping will be Rock Armored
Rook Char
Rook Char
normals, and even then it won't be that helpful. Using Gold Burst, then using the newly gained aces as Wrath of Earth
Midori A
Midori A
after a normal attack is what you'll be doing most of the time with your jokers.

This matchup is strongly in Rook's favor.


DeGrey

Midori vs DeGrey

This guy likes to dodge, and sometimes throw. He can't really dodge against you, and your throws outspeed his easily. He is the perfect target for throwloops, since he'll often willingly dump his hand early on, to get the most from his innate, Moral High Ground
DeGrey Char
DeGrey Char
. Just play as usual, mixup between blocks and throws, throwloop when he's low on cards, bust out dragon moves when you're ready to, and you'll do fine.

This matchup is strongly in Midori's favor.


Valerie

Midori vs Valerie

This matchup is pretty much as vanilla standard as you can get, with no notable interactions between the two characters' abilities, with the caveat that Valerie's damage mostly comes from big combos, so keeping your jokers for combo escapes is reasonable. Stick to your usual strategies.

This matchup is even.


Geiger

Midori vs Geiger

Geiger's innate
Geiger Char
Geiger Char
means that he will spam a lot of Time Spirals in combat, so be ready for your usual "fireball" counters: Q
Midori Q
Midori Q
, AA
Midori A
Midori A
, dodge, or clashing with J
Midori J
Midori J
. Geiger's Time Spirals are: Fast Time Spiral (J, speed 2.4)
Geiger J
Geiger J
, Slow Time Spiral (Q, speed 3.4)
Geiger Q
Geiger Q
and Time Spiral Hurricane (AA, speed 2.0)
Geiger A
Geiger A
. Fortunately, he usually doesn't deal a lot of damage from attacking in combat, so you can use normal throws a bit more liberally than usual, and throwloops work well. Unfortunately, his Flash Gear (K)
Geiger K
Geiger K
will be a huge pain to deal with. If you get knocked down, or if Geiger activates Temporal Distortion
Geiger 4
Geiger 4
, it's very reasonable to burn a Q, AA, J, or Joker to avoid getting Time Stopped
Geiger Char
Geiger Char
by his Time Spirals. If you are knocked down and Geiger has Temporal distortion, using Q, AA, J or Joker is even more important (they are your only guarantee that you won't get spiral-comboed). Consider generally saving those cards (Q, A, J, Joker) to get out of these situations.

This matchup is strongly in Geiger's favor.


Lum

Midori vs Lum

This matchup will be a long one. Lum has excellent face
Lum J
Lum J
card
Lum Q
Lum Q
attacks
Lum K
Lum K
and poor throws
Lum 6
Lum 6
, so be ready to block a lot. His key move is Rolling Panda (Q)
Lum Q
Lum Q
, his only attack that outspeeds your Dragon Mountain (Q)
Midori Q
Midori Q
. Lum will often want to use Q as soon as he gets it. You'll want to keep a close eye on his discard pile for any Qs, and use your own Dragon Mountain right after he uses a Q and discards it, to be safer. Dragon Mountain
Midori Q
Midori Q
is important enough that, if you don't have a 2 (Dragon Form)
Midori 2
Midori 2
when you need it, you'll prefer using your 10s
Midori 10
Midori 10
more for their ability, Glimpse of the Dragon, than for their dodges, even if Lum's constant attacks might make you want to dodge. It's especially hard to land Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
on Lum, so don't be afraid to dump your aces as Wrath of Earth (AA, humanform attack) whenever you get the chance.

This matchup is in Lum's favor.


Argagarg

Midori vs Argagarg

Argagarg likes to block with Bubble Shield (Ace block)
Argagarg A
Argagarg A
a lot, so you'll have some pressure to throw him a lot. His innate
Argagarg Char
Argagarg Char
means that you won't have the luxury of blocking that much, but do expect him to use random face
Argagarg J
Argagarg J
card
Argagarg Q
Argagarg Q
attacks
Argagarg K
Argagarg K
in combat rather often, too, so a balanced approach is best. Argagarg doesn't rely on combos, so it's fine to use your jokers as Gold Bursts to get some aces. Since he has Bubble Shield
Argagarg A
Argagarg A
, you might prefer to use your aces for Final Dragon Buster
Midori A
Midori A
directly in combat.

This matchup is slightly in Midori's favor.



Yomi Characters

GraveMidoriRookValerieLum
QuinceTroqMenelkerGloriaVendetta
JainaSetsukiDeGreyGeigerArgagarg
OnimaruBBBPersephoneGwenZane


See also: Midori (PS), Midori (FD)

Namespaces
Variants
Actions